Egypt: Burials and Antiquities Department finds Sea Fort dates back to Roman Times

Egypt: The department for Treasures, burials and antiquities of the Arab world in Egypt has recently shared a new finding where scientists and archaeologists have found a Sea Fort from the first century, dating back to the Roman Times. 

Egypt: Burials and Antiquities Department finds Sea Fort dates back to Roman Times (image credits Facebook)
image credits Facebook

Egypt: The department for Treasures, burials and antiquities of the Arab world in Egypt has recently shared a new finding where scientists and archaeologists have found a Sea Fort from the first century, dating back to the Roman Times. 

As per the sources, the Syrian coast has been previously characterized by its ancient monuments before history, and many civilizations have passed through it that used the sea in their trade and wars. 

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The Syrian coasts are also known as one of the oldest coasts on which ports were built, which was discovered in the past.

Furthermore, the department has also conveyed through the exploration now found. -. S. O. -. During the second field season of the joint Russian-Syrian archaeological mission, which extends to this day.

In his remarks, the Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and Russian International Relations, Dmitry Tatarkov, said: “It may not even be a port, but it is a 1st-century naval fort and remains of hydraulic structures,

a lighthouse and four marble columns have been found that will allow for the accompanying pottery for more detailed date of the piece.” And this is a major discovery.”

According to him, the scientists visually examined the seabed with the help of underwater guided vehicles. Meanwhile, in addition to the harbour, three previously unknown anchors were discovered from ancient times, along with the remains of old hydraulic structures,

wave barriers and quay walls. The elevated porcelain is now being treated in the Tartus archaeological circle.

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In the end, the Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and Russian International Relations, Dmitry Tatarkov, added, “These are the remains of ancient Greek amphibians, Phoenician pots, Egyptian vases and Roman stone housewares”.

Dmitry Tatarkov concluded, “These materials will allow us to rebuild the maritime trade routes that link this area to the greater Mediterranean and will be able to determine the life cycle of ports that existed at the time.”

 

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